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Novel Meshes for Multivariate Interpolation and Approximation Thomas C. H. Lux, Layne T. Watson, Tyler H. Chang, Jon Bernard, Bo Li, Xiaodong Yu, Li Xu, Godmar Back, Ali R. Butt, Kirk W. Cameron, Yili Hong, Danfeng Yao Virginia Polytechnic


  1. 
 Novel Meshes for Multivariate Interpolation and Approximation Thomas C. H. Lux, Layne T. Watson, Tyler H. Chang, Jon Bernard, Bo Li, Xiaodong Yu, Li Xu, Godmar Back, Ali R. Butt, Kirk W. Cameron, Yili Hong, Danfeng Yao Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University This work was supported by the National Science Foundation Grant CNS-1565314.

  2. Motivation Regression and interpolation are problems of considerable importance that find applications across many fields of science. ! 2

  3. Motivation Regression and interpolation are problems of considerable importance that find applications across many fields of science. Pollution and air quality analysis 
 Energy consumption management 
 Student performance prediction ! 2

  4. Motivation Regression and interpolation are problems of considerable importance that find applications across many fields of science. Pollution and air quality analysis 
 Energy consumption management 
 Student performance prediction These techniques are applied here to: ! 2

  5. Motivation Regression and interpolation are problems of considerable importance that find applications across many fields of science. Pollution and air quality analysis 
 Energy consumption management 
 Student performance prediction These techniques are applied here to: High performance computing file input/output (HPC I/O) 
 Parkinson's patient clinical evaluations 
 Forest fire risk assessment ! 2

  6. Problem Formulation Given underlying function f : ℝ d ⇾ ℝ 
 n × d with row vectors x (i) ∈ ℝ d 
 data matrix X (i) ) for all x (i) 
 response values f (x (i) ) matrix f (X) has rows f (x ! 3

  7. Problem Formulation Given underlying function f : ℝ d ⇾ ℝ 
 n × d with row vectors x (i) ∈ ℝ d 
 data matrix X (i) ) for all x (i) 
 response values f (x (i) ) matrix f (X) has rows f (x Generate a function g : ℝ d ⇾ ℝ such that: ! 3

  8. Problem Formulation Given underlying function f : ℝ d ⇾ ℝ 
 n × d with row vectors x (i) ∈ ℝ d 
 data matrix X (i) ) for all x (i) 
 response values f (x (i) ) matrix f (X) has rows f (x Generate a function g : ℝ d ⇾ ℝ such that: Interpolation 
 (i) ) equals f (x (i) ) for all x (i) g (x ! 3

  9. Problem Formulation Given underlying function f : ℝ d ⇾ ℝ 
 n × d with row vectors x (i) ∈ ℝ d 
 data matrix X (i) ) for all x (i) 
 response values f (x (i) ) matrix f (X) has rows f (x Generate a function g : ℝ d ⇾ ℝ such that: Interpolation 
 (i) ) equals f (x (i) ) for all x (i) g (x Approximation 
 g has parameters P and is the 
 solution to min P ║ f (X) - g(X) ║ ! 3

  10. Box Splines Proposed by C. de Boor as an extension of B-Splines into multiple dimensions (without using tensor products). 1.0 0.6 0.8 0.4 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! 4

  11. 
 
 
 Box Splines Proposed by C. de Boor as an extension of B-Splines into multiple dimensions (without using tensor products). Can be shifted and 
 1.0 0.6 scaled without losing 0.8 0.4 0.6 smoothness. 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! 4

  12. 
 
 
 Box Splines Proposed by C. de Boor as an extension of B-Splines into multiple dimensions (without using tensor products). Can be shifted and 
 1.0 0.6 scaled without losing 0.8 0.4 0.6 smoothness. 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Computationally tractable. ! 4

  13. 
 
 
 Box Splines Proposed by C. de Boor as an extension of B-Splines into multiple dimensions (without using tensor products). Can be shifted and 
 1.0 0.6 scaled without losing 0.8 0.4 0.6 smoothness. 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Computationally tractable. ! 4

  14. Max Box Mesh (MBM) Properties Largest max norm distance from anchor to edge of support. Not always a covering for the space. 
 Construction Complexity For each box (n) Distance to all (nd) 
 For each dimension (2d) Sort distances (n log n) 
 퓞 (n 2 d log n) ! 5

  15. Iterative Box Mesh (IBM) Properties Built-in bootstrapping used to guide construction. Always a covering for the space by construction. 
 Construction Complexity Until all points are added (n) Identify boxes containing new anchor to add (n) Shrink boxes containing new anchor along all dimensions (d) 
 퓞 (n 2 + nd) ! 6

  16. Voronoi Mesh (VM) Properties Naturally shaped geometric regions (not forcibly axis aligned) Always a covering for the space by construction. Construction Complexity 퓞 (n 2 d) Prediction Complexity For each cell anchor (n) For each other anchor, 
 compute distance (nd) 퓞 (n 2 d) ! 7

  17. Fitting and Bootstrapping Fitting Evaluate all basis functions in the mesh at all points n . ! 8

  18. Fitting and Bootstrapping Fitting Evaluate all basis functions in the mesh at all points n . When “c” is the number of control points used for a mesh, using an (n × c) matrix A of basis function evaluations at all points, solve the least squares problem A x = f (X) with cost 퓞 (nc 2 + c 3 ). ! 8

  19. Fitting and Bootstrapping Fitting Evaluate all basis functions in the mesh at all points n . When “c” is the number of control points used for a mesh, using an (n × c) matrix A of basis function evaluations at all points, solve the least squares problem A x = f (X) with cost 퓞 (nc 2 + c 3 ). Bootstrapping ! 8

  20. Fitting and Bootstrapping Fitting Evaluate all basis functions in the mesh at all points n . When “c” is the number of control points used for a mesh, using an (n × c) matrix A of basis function evaluations at all points, solve the least squares problem A x = f (X) with cost 퓞 (nc 2 + c 3 ). Bootstrapping Initialize mesh only using the most central point ! 8

  21. Fitting and Bootstrapping Fitting Evaluate all basis functions in the mesh at all points n . When “c” is the number of control points used for a mesh, using an (n × c) matrix A of basis function evaluations at all points, solve the least squares problem A x = f (X) with cost 퓞 (nc 2 + c 3 ). Bootstrapping Initialize mesh only using the most central point Fit mesh and evaluate error at all other points ! 8

  22. Fitting and Bootstrapping Fitting Evaluate all basis functions in the mesh at all points n . When “c” is the number of control points used for a mesh, using an (n × c) matrix A of basis function evaluations at all points, solve the least squares problem A x = f (X) with cost 퓞 (nc 2 + c 3 ). Bootstrapping Initialize mesh only using the most central point Fit mesh and evaluate error at all other points Add (batch of) point(s) with largest error to mesh ! 8

  23. Fitting and Bootstrapping Fitting Evaluate all basis functions in the mesh at all points n . When “c” is the number of control points used for a mesh, using an (n × c) matrix A of basis function evaluations at all points, solve the least squares problem A x = f (X) with cost 퓞 (nc 2 + c 3 ). Bootstrapping Initialize mesh only using the most central point Fit mesh and evaluate error at all other points Add (batch of) point(s) with largest error to mesh If average error is not below error tolerance , repeat ! 8

  24. Fitting and Bootstrapping Fitting Evaluate all basis functions in the mesh at all points n . When “c” is the number of control points used for a mesh, using an (n × c) matrix A of basis function evaluations at all points, solve the least squares problem A x = f (X) with cost 퓞 (nc 2 + c 3 ). Bootstrapping Initialize mesh only using the most central point Fit mesh and evaluate error at all other points Add (batch of) point(s) with largest error to mesh If average error is not below error tolerance , repeat Increased cost up to 퓞 (n) ! 8

  25. Testing and Evaluation: Data ! 9

  26. Testing and Evaluation: Data ��� High Performance Computing File I/O 
 ��� ��� n = 532, d = 4 
 ��� �� predicting file I/O throughput � � � × �� � � × �� � � × �� � � × �� � � × �� � ! 9

  27. 
 
 Testing and Evaluation: Data ��� High Performance Computing File I/O 
 ��� ��� n = 532, d = 4 
 ��� �� predicting file I/O throughput � � � × �� � � × �� � � × �� � � × �� � � × �� � Forest Fire 
 �� n = 517, d = 12 
 �� �� predicting area burned �� � ��� ��� ��� ��� ! 9

  28. 
 
 Testing and Evaluation: Data ��� High Performance Computing File I/O 
 ��� ��� n = 532, d = 4 
 ��� �� predicting file I/O throughput � � � × �� � � × �� � � × �� � � × �� � � × �� � Forest Fire 
 �� n = 517, d = 12 
 �� �� predicting area burned �� � ��� ��� ��� ��� Parkinson’s Clinical Evaluation 
 ��� ��� n = 468, d = 16 
 �� �� �� predicting total clinical “UPDRS” score �� � �� �� �� �� �� ! 9

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